Monday, February 1, 2010

February 1, 2010


Tiewaz is the letter T

Anglo-Saxon Rune Poem (from

Tiewaz is a guiding star; well does it keep faith with princes;
it is ever on its course over the mists of night and never fails.

As the stanza indicates, Tiewaz (or Tiw) is a guiding star. Other Futharks give it to be the god Tyr, a god of justice and war, but not savage war, but tactics and planning. Tyr has a very famous story about him sacrificing his hand to the Fenris wolf, as an agreement between the Fenris and the gods, that the gods would release him from this duergar crafted ribbon if Fenris could not escape from it. When Fenris was fully bound, the gods did not release him, and so Tyr, keeping his word, let the wolf bite it off and devour it. In that sense, Tyr is also about honor and integrity, keeping your word and responsibilities, even when doing so is probably undesired. Amidst the judgment, war, and honor, is a sense of pervading Wisdom. This is the Wisdom that can be expressed in correct judgment, the wisdom of correct tactics in battle, and the wisdom born from living a life of honor and integrity.
In a reading, Tiewaz represents all of those things. Which exact expressions comes out through discernment of the reader or the greater context of the reader. For myself, I am reminded of responsibilities I have to see to for today. Responsibilities that I am not terribly fond of, that I need to keep. It is also a call to wisdom, and trusting in guidance that I have access to.

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